JOHN ANDERSON
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"I quickly decided to let my artwork reflect and express the printing process itself. That seemed more interesting to me than the final image alone. I wanted to "construct" my final print by combining and manipulating 1) the artwork transparency, 2) the exposed plate, 3) the printed image and 4) the paper on which it was printed. In this way, four layers are combined and the transparency, translucency and opacity of the layers create a real physical and visual depth to the final artwork. The print evolves from 2D to 3D. Rotating and reversing or flipping these four elements also allowed me to create more complexity and richness in the final piece. Finally, by using all of the physical elements in the process, color became important as well—the printed image is black, the plate is a beautiful translucent blue and the original artwork transparency could have some color applied to it as well."
 
http://www.johnandersonstudio.com/

JOHN ANDERSON

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"I quickly decided to let my artwork reflect and express the printing process itself. That seemed more interesting to me than the final image alone. I wanted to "construct" my final print by combining and manipulating 1) the artwork transparency, 2) the exposed plate, 3) the printed image and 4) the paper on which it was printed. In this way, four layers are combined and the transparency, translucency and opacity of the layers create a real physical and visual depth to the final artwork. The print evolves from 2D to 3D. Rotating and reversing or flipping these four elements also allowed me to create more complexity and richness in the final piece. Finally, by using all of the physical elements in the process, color became important as well—the printed image is black, the plate is a beautiful translucent blue and the original artwork transparency could have some color applied to it as well."

 

http://www.johnandersonstudio.com/

MARC AWODEY
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"My work is very simple and direct. The anatomy of the picture is always more important than the anatomy of the subject."
http://www.marcawodey.com/

MARC AWODEY

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"My work is very simple and direct. The anatomy of the picture is always more important than the anatomy of the subject."

http://www.marcawodey.com/

SANDRA BERBECO
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"The image for the prints I worked on for this 30/30 show came from the book: Japanese Pattern in Wood, Paper & Clay by Katachi.  I wanted to create texture in this series and looked to the wood section of the book: specifically two wood pieces joined by nails.  In my prints, I marked the nails with carborundum to give the image heft.  I enjoyed rolling out the ink (Rembrandt black) and the wiping, drawing and mark making into it on the carved (Plexiglas) plate to refine my results.
Thank you, Sumru, for reminding me what fun print-making can be.”
http://sandraberbeco.com/

SANDRA BERBECO

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"The image for the prints I worked on for this 30/30 show came from the book: Japanese Pattern in Wood, Paper & Clay by Katachi.  I wanted to create texture in this series and looked to the wood section of the book: specifically two wood pieces joined by nails.  In my prints, I marked the nails with carborundum to give the image heft.  I enjoyed rolling out the ink (Rembrandt black) and the wiping, drawing and mark making into it on the carved (Plexiglas) plate to refine my results.

Thank you, Sumru, for reminding me what fun print-making can be.”

http://sandraberbeco.com/

GREGG BLASDEL (COORDINATOR & ARTIST)
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"I have never thought of myself exclusively as a printmaker but I am increasingly drawn to the printing process. My particular print for the 30/30 project was inspired by a print that I found on my grandfathers workbench after his death. He was amused by the ambiguous space depicted among the three walking figures legs. My grandfather who ran a fruit orchard was a great draftsman, had a bent sense of humor and remains a puzzle to me.
DON’T PANIC…
When I started the print project my area of ‘expertise’ was to be with ImagOn, a new non-toxic etching process. I had casually worked with two generations of the ImagOn film for about 4 to 5 years patching together tools and equipment in a makeshift manner and I had achieved moderate to good success. When the 30/30 Print Project started I realized that there was a new, third generation of High Definition ImagOn film that had characteristics and processing techniques that I was not familiar with. In fact I could not get the film to respond to any of the processes that I had previously had success with. The inventor of the ImagOn process, Keith Howard had recently published his second book that outlined the differences in the film and all of the new procedural requirements. I purchased the book and started reading only to discover that the film would no longer respond to the photo lamps that I had been using to expose the image and instead required a commercial Plate Burner with a vacuum table and a powerful 1000 W Mercury Vapor lamp.  I found a used plate burner on eBay that was located in Indiana and I purchased it and had it shipped to Vermont. 
The plate burner arrived and I began to familiarize myself with the working of the machine. My first problem was to reorient my thinking from darkroom time in seconds and adapt a system for exposing plates relying on time measured in Light Units.  
My next undertaking was to learn how to use an Aquatint Screen. The Aquatint screen is a flexible Mylar sheet composed of thousands of random dots that create continuous, non linear areas of light and dark tones in a print.  
Beyond mastering technical problems the primary source of my knowledge came from the variety of work that the printmakers in my group presented.  Each artist’s work was conceived and presented in a unique way and a different solution was necessary for each work.”
http://7dvt.com/2010two-tango

GREGG BLASDEL (COORDINATOR & ARTIST)

CLICK HERE TO BID ONLINE

"I have never thought of myself exclusively as a printmaker but I am increasingly drawn to the printing process. My particular print for the 30/30 project was inspired by a print that I found on my grandfathers workbench after his death. He was amused by the ambiguous space depicted among the three walking figures legs. My grandfather who ran a fruit orchard was a great draftsman, had a bent sense of humor and remains a puzzle to me.

DON’T PANIC…

When I started the print project my area of ‘expertise’ was to be with ImagOn, a new non-toxic etching process. I had casually worked with two generations of the ImagOn film for about 4 to 5 years patching together tools and equipment in a makeshift manner and I had achieved moderate to good success. When the 30/30 Print Project started I realized that there was a new, third generation of High Definition ImagOn film that had characteristics and processing techniques that I was not familiar with. In fact I could not get the film to respond to any of the processes that I had previously had success with. The inventor of the ImagOn process, Keith Howard had recently published his second book that outlined the differences in the film and all of the new procedural requirements. I purchased the book and started reading only to discover that the film would no longer respond to the photo lamps that I had been using to expose the image and instead required a commercial Plate Burner with a vacuum table and a powerful 1000 W Mercury Vapor lamp.  I found a used plate burner on eBay that was located in Indiana and I purchased it and had it shipped to Vermont.

The plate burner arrived and I began to familiarize myself with the working of the machine. My first problem was to reorient my thinking from darkroom time in seconds and adapt a system for exposing plates relying on time measured in Light Units. 

My next undertaking was to learn how to use an Aquatint Screen. The Aquatint screen is a flexible Mylar sheet composed of thousands of random dots that create continuous, non linear areas of light and dark tones in a print.  

Beyond mastering technical problems the primary source of my knowledge came from the variety of work that the printmakers in my group presented.  Each artist’s work was conceived and presented in a unique way and a different solution was necessary for each work.”

http://7dvt.com/2010two-tango

HARRY BLISS
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"My print image is a portrait of Bernie Sanders. His smart no-nonsense approach to politics is echoed in the medium of the woodblock print. Indeed, wood is emblematic of the strength of Vermont’s spirit. Cutting into the pine board, I attempted to convey a hard-working compassionate soul who embodies a righteous determination. For me, Bernie is the ideal voice for all those Vermonters that make up the backbone of our great state."
 
http://www.harrybliss.com/

HARRY BLISS

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"My print image is a portrait of Bernie Sanders. His smart no-nonsense approach to politics is echoed in the medium of the woodblock print. Indeed, wood is emblematic of the strength of Vermont’s spirit. Cutting into the pine board, I attempted to convey a hard-working compassionate soul who embodies a righteous determination. For me, Bernie is the ideal voice for all those Vermonters that make up the backbone of our great state."

 

http://www.harrybliss.com/

GALEN CHENEY
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"I feel so fortunate to have been selected to participate in the 30/30 Print Project, and to have worked with Sumru Tekin. I am a painter, by trade, and in the past have been somewhat intimidated by the printmaking process. My work tends to be very process oriented, messy, and driven by intuition. Because of that, I sort of felt like printmaking wouldn’t be a good fit for me, but the process I learned from Sumru for this project—drypoint etching with carborundum on Plexiglas plates—lent itself well to my way of working as an artist, and by the end of my third session with Sumru, I felt like I had found my groove within the process, and was able to express myself with some degree of satisfaction. I hope to incorporate this newly learned technique into my studio practice. Thank you for this opportunity!”
http://galencheney.com/

GALEN CHENEY

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"I feel so fortunate to have been selected to participate in the 30/30 Print Project, and to have worked with Sumru Tekin. I am a painter, by trade, and in the past have been somewhat intimidated by the printmaking process. My work tends to be very process oriented, messy, and driven by intuition. Because of that, I sort of felt like printmaking wouldn’t be a good fit for me, but the process I learned from Sumru for this project—drypoint etching with carborundum on Plexiglas plates—lent itself well to my way of working as an artist, and by the end of my third session with Sumru, I felt like I had found my groove within the process, and was able to express myself with some degree of satisfaction. I hope to incorporate this newly learned technique into my studio practice. Thank you for this opportunity!”

http://galencheney.com/

CAMERON DAVIS
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"The woodblock is of Vermont’s new aster, Symphyotrichum urophyllum, discovered October 2011. What appears to be a benign image of a flower takes on a new meaning as we begin to understand that the reason this flower’s habitat is creeping northward is due to climate change.”
http://www.camidavis.com/

CAMERON DAVIS

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"The woodblock is of Vermont’s new aster, Symphyotrichum urophyllum, discovered October 2011. What appears to be a benign image of a flower takes on a new meaning as we begin to understand that the reason this flower’s habitat is creeping northward is due to climate change.”

http://www.camidavis.com/

NANCY DWYER
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"I decided to reproduce a letter I wrote to a friend in 1977. The friend sent me a photo of the letter on facebook a while back. It is simple, and sort of funny (I was 22.) It is called "1977."I thought Gregg’s examples of the photo process he is using made things look like they were old, like memories. That is why I chose this image for the print.”
http://www.nancydwyer.com/

NANCY DWYER

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"I decided to reproduce a letter I wrote to a friend in 1977. The friend sent me a photo of the letter on facebook a while back. It is simple, and sort of funny (I was 22.) It is called "1977."

I thought Gregg’s examples of the photo process he is using made things look like they were old, like memories. That is why I chose this image for the print.”

http://www.nancydwyer.com/

STEVEN GOODMAN
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"As an artist who has spent much time creating digital imagery and paintings I was thrilled to be asked to participate in this project. Creating these prints marked a return to my roots… an interest in drawing, working with a monochromatic palette, attempting to capture the epic sweep of the landscape. Thank you for inviting me to participate and for all the instruction and guidance I received along the way. And thanks for all the great BCA contributions to the Burlington community over the last 30 years."
http://spgoodman.blogspot.com/

STEVEN GOODMAN

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"As an artist who has spent much time creating digital imagery and paintings I was thrilled to be asked to participate in this project. Creating these prints marked a return to my roots… an interest in drawing, working with a monochromatic palette, attempting to capture the epic sweep of the landscape. Thank you for inviting me to participate and for all the instruction and guidance I received along the way. And thanks for all the great BCA contributions to the Burlington community over the last 30 years."

http://spgoodman.blogspot.com/

BEN COHEN & JERRY GREENFIELD
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"The ice cream cone is the universal symbol of childlike happiness and joy. We chose to slice it up and "explode" it to symbolize both the loss of that joy and happiness due to the rending of the social fabric by corporate interests as well as the potential of the good vibes of ice cream to spread throughout the land and return us to a state of joy and happiness.  We particularly enjoyed working with Jennifer Koch, who was not only inspirational but also delightful."
http://www.benjerry.com/company/history/

BEN COHEN & JERRY GREENFIELD

CLICK HERE TO BID ONLINE

"The ice cream cone is the universal symbol of childlike happiness and joy. We chose to slice it up and "explode" it to symbolize both the loss of that joy and happiness due to the rending of the social fabric by corporate interests as well as the potential of the good vibes of ice cream to spread throughout the land and return us to a state of joy and happiness.  We particularly enjoyed working with Jennifer Koch, who was not only inspirational but also delightful."

http://www.benjerry.com/company/history/

GARY HALL
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"This has been my first go round with printmaking and I discovered a special joy in creating impromptu abstractions. I built up a thick layer of ink as if starting with darkness, then removed the ink as if adding light. I used oil and a scraping tool to create spatial layering and extemporaneous forms.”
http://www.garyhallphoto.com/

GARY HALL

CLICK HERE TO BID ONLINE

"This has been my first go round with printmaking and I discovered a special joy in creating impromptu abstractions. I built up a thick layer of ink as if starting with darkness, then removed the ink as if adding light. I used oil and a scraping tool to create spatial layering and extemporaneous forms.”

http://www.garyhallphoto.com/

VALERIE HIRD
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“THE FIFTH DAY II & III, are monoprints modified with oil paint and crayon They are part of a mythologically inspired series entitled THE FIFTH DAY.  The entire body of work, opening at the Nohra Haime Gallery in NYC in January, 2012, focuses on that cosmic moment before the arrival of man. In a nod to Genesis, I’ve paused the Six Day origin story in order to explore four of the natural systems – sea, sky, earth, and wind – in all their pre-human wonder and enchantment.
I love working in monotype – but being a painter, and a colorist - it’s difficult to allow the press the last word in my process. So, with gratitude to Sumru, I took the prints back to my studio and worked over them with oil paint and crayon. Each is unique and has a slightly different response to the colors.
I don’t often get the opportunity to play with imagery and ink in a good cause. I’m grateful to BCA and the Flynn for allowing me to give back to my city in this fun and creative way. Thank you!”
http://www.valeriehird.com/

VALERIE HIRD

CLICK HERE TO BID ONLINE

THE FIFTH DAY II & III, are monoprints modified with oil paint and crayon They are part of a mythologically inspired series entitled THE FIFTH DAY.  The entire body of work, opening at the Nohra Haime Gallery in NYC in January, 2012, focuses on that cosmic moment before the arrival of man. In a nod to Genesis, I’ve paused the Six Day origin story in order to explore four of the natural systems – sea, sky, earth, and wind – in all their pre-human wonder and enchantment.

I love working in monotype – but being a painter, and a colorist - it’s difficult to allow the press the last word in my process. So, with gratitude to Sumru, I took the prints back to my studio and worked over them with oil paint and crayon. Each is unique and has a slightly different response to the colors.

I don’t often get the opportunity to play with imagery and ink in a good cause. I’m grateful to BCA and the Flynn for allowing me to give back to my city in this fun and creative way. Thank you!”

http://www.valeriehird.com/

MICHAEL JAGER
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'The Lovers - inspired by the purity of the print making process - the directness of expression and the elegant simplicity of it all guided me to the essential…in form, in content, in meaning. Though it may only speak to me of these things the volatility of life and love is what I was thinking about as the image emerged.” 
 
http://www.jdk.com/
 
 

MICHAEL JAGER

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'The Lovers - inspired by the purity of the print making process - the directness of expression and the elegant simplicity of it all guided me to the essential…in form, in content, in meaning. Though it may only speak to me of these things the volatility of life and love is what I was thinking about as the image emerged.” 

 

http://www.jdk.com/

 

 

LINDA E. JONES
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"It had been 3 or 4 years since I had worked in the BCA print shop and I was pleasantly surprised by the changes. My degree is in both painting and lithography and so have had some experience in different print shops. It was a delightful experience working with Sumru (friend and colleague) who kept us steady at the helm. Her professionalism, warm and calm demeanor was perfect for her role as guide. We worked with one other printer (also involved in this project) the four sessions I was in the shop. A few of those times happened to be with friends I had known for many years.  This led to a great working rhythm, delightful atmosphere and supportive chatter while we worked. My image was based on a previous painting I had done, entitled Poet’s Heart. Using multiples plates (some plexi, some cardboard) and registration I explored a recurring theme in my work. I ended up with five prints-  all different due to the mono print aspects of some of the plates that were used. I’m happy to report I’m pleased with the results, had great fun in the process and feel very grateful to have been a part of this project.”
http://www.lindaejones.com/ 

LINDA E. JONES

CLICK HERE TO BID ONLINE

"It had been 3 or 4 years since I had worked in the BCA print shop and I was pleasantly surprised by the changes. My degree is in both painting and lithography and so have had some experience in different print shops. It was a delightful experience working with Sumru (friend and colleague) who kept us steady at the helm. Her professionalism, warm and calm demeanor was perfect for her role as guide. We worked with one other printer (also involved in this project) the four sessions I was in the shop. A few of those times happened to be with friends I had known for many years.  This led to a great working rhythm, delightful atmosphere and supportive chatter while we worked. My image was based on a previous painting I had done, entitled Poet’s Heart. Using multiples plates (some plexi, some cardboard) and registration I explored a recurring theme in my work. I ended up with five prints-  all different due to the mono print aspects of some of the plates that were used. I’m happy to report I’m pleased with the results, had great fun in the process and feel very grateful to have been a part of this project.”

http://www.lindaejones.com/ 

JOHN R. KILLACKY
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"Sixteen years ago, I was paralyzed from the neck down from complications from spinal surgery. Today, I remain paraplegic and ambulate with a cane. Throughout my (ongoing) rehabilitation process I called upon my artistic self to cope with the enormity of the physical and emotional toll. Four disability-related films have been screened world-wide, essays and opinion pieces published in various magazines and newspapers, and I keynoted disability conferences throughout the country. My writing has also been featured in the Helen Keller Foundation’s "Reading Lips and Other Ways to Overcome a Disability" and in the Lambda award-winning "Queer Crips: Disabled Gay Men and Their Stories" that I co-edited.
For the 30/30 print project, I chose excerpts from three narratives and processed them through the Wordle website (www.wordle.net/create) generating word clouds from my text. All random, and yet precise – just like life, just like my disability. My collaborator, the marvelous and very generous Gregg Blasdel, then printed the image.”

http://www.flynncenter.org/

JOHN R. KILLACKY

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"Sixteen years ago, I was paralyzed from the neck down from complications from spinal surgery. Today, I remain paraplegic and ambulate with a cane. Throughout my (ongoing) rehabilitation process I called upon my artistic self to cope with the enormity of the physical and emotional toll. Four disability-related films have been screened world-wide, essays and opinion pieces published in various magazines and newspapers, and I keynoted disability conferences throughout the country. My writing has also been featured in the Helen Keller Foundation’s "Reading Lips and Other Ways to Overcome a Disability" and in the Lambda award-winning "Queer Crips: Disabled Gay Men and Their Stories" that I co-edited.

For the 30/30 print project, I chose excerpts from three narratives and processed them through the Wordle website (www.wordle.net/create) generating word clouds from my text. All random, and yet precise – just like life, just like my disability. My collaborator, the marvelous and very generous Gregg Blasdel, then printed the image.”

http://www.flynncenter.org/